“This Is Not Your Grandfather’s NACIQI”; Takeaways from the June Institutional Quality Review Meeting

“This Is Not Your Grandfather’s NACIQI”; Takeaways from the June
Institutional Quality Review Meeting
By Amber Saddler
Amber Saddler is a Policy Assistant with EducationCounsel where she works on a range of higher education and K-12 issues to help improve equity and education access for all students. She enjoys long walks on the beach and observing federal advisory boards at work.
Recently, I joined the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI) and spent three very long and very exciting days in a hotel conference room in Northern Virginia while the committee made recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) to continue or deny federal recognition to programmatic and institutional accreditation agencies wishing to serve as gatekeepers to federal funding under Title IV of the Higher Education Act.
Among the audience, there was great interest in NACIQI’s recommendation to ED to revoke federal recognition of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS). While ACICS was the only agency NACIQI is currently suggesting should have its recognition removed, many committee members made it clear that other accrediting agencies, especially the […]

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Start Your Engines: Why Pending, Draft Federal Regulations on ESSA State Plans Are So Important, And Five Things to Look For

In the days ahead, the US Department of Education (ED) is expected to publish its first proposed regulations under the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This will likely include hundreds of pages of draft regulations and explanation on critical education policy issues under Title I of the Act, including federal requirements regarding state assessments, state accountability systems, and state-local supports for lowest-performing schools. But the proposed regulations will also address another critical topic that has gotten less attention – “consolidated state plans.”
These state plans are critical to the success of ESSA implementation, as they will likely define (at least in part) the contours of state (and local) implementation over the next several years, and will likely jump start ESSA activity. If done right, state plans will set expectations for leadership, coherence, impact, and continuous improvement in ESSA implementation. This is the first time in nearly 15 years that states must take a comprehensive look at their plans under federal law.
Here are five questions that stakeholders should ask as states and districts begin to develop their consolidated plans:

What is […]

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President Obama signs Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)

On December 10, 2015 the President signed the “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA), which reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and replaces the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This document provides a brief summary based on our legal and policy judgment of some key provisions in the 1061-page ESSA bill based on our initial read. The precise meaning and impact of ESSA will continue to play out through regulations, guidance, and implementation over the coming months and years – presenting both opportunities and risks on the federal, state, and local levels for improving education systems and outcomes for all students in the nation.

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A New Approach to Problem Solving in Education

How often are teachers charged with fixing the problems that plague our education systems? For years, change in education has occurred through top-down and centralized policymaking. Design thinking, a user-centered approach commonly used in Silicon Valley’s tech firms for the past decade, offers an alternative to these top-down methods. You can read more about design thinking from Ideo (via Harvard Business Review) and Stanford.

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Welcome to the new website of EducationCounsel

Welcome to the new website of EducationCounsel. We are excited to share our work with visitors and to highlight the important activities of our partners. Each day we work to improve education and close the achievement gap, focusing on building systems of quality that are available to all from early childhood through higher education.

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E-Update for July 31, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 24, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 17, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 10, 2015

House Passes the Student Success Act: The House passed H.R. 5, the Student Success Act, on a very close recorded vote of 218-213. The process began this week with the House Rules Committee meeting on July 7 to establish the rules and amendments in order for debate, and concluded a day later with the final passage of the bill. Of the 14 amendments in order, 5 were agreed to, 9 were not agreed to, and 1 was withdrawn.

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Charting a better way forward for South Carolina after church killings

On the evening of June 17, 2015, a hate crime took place at a Wednesday prayer meeting at Mother Emanuel AME Church near Marion Square in Charleston.
The absolutely horrid nature of the crime, the cold-blooded assassination of innocent people solely because they were black — all under the ideology of white supremacy — shocked us all. It tore at the social fabric we all depend on to carry out our daily lives in a civilized way in our communities and our country. And it is this kind of senseless crime, shaped by racism and fueled by hate and hate talk, that our state must confront in a common sense and deliberate way.

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