E-Update for the Week of March 22, 2021

E-Update for the Week of March 22, 2021

Highlights:

  • On March 24, USED will hold the National Safe School Reopening Summit starting at 12:00 pm. The summit will feature remarks by First Lady Jill Biden and will focus on how schools can reopen safely and quickly.
  • On March 18, the Senate voted 50-49, largely on party lines, to confirm Xavier Becerra to serve as the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) was the only Republican Senator to vote for Becerra’s confirmation.
  • On March 17, USED announced that it will begin dispersing funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) to states by the end of March.

Biden Administration:

Nominations:

Becerra confirmed as HHS Secretary with 50-49 vote: The Senate voted 50-49, largely on party lines, to confirm Xavier Becerra to serve as the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) was the only Republican Senator to vote for Becerra’s confirmation. Prior to being confirmed, Senate Finance Committee Republicans unanimously opposed Becerra resulting in a tied committee vote of 14-14 and requiring the full Senate to first vote to discharge the nomination from committee. Previously, Becerra served as the Attorney General of the State of California and 12 terms in Congress as a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives. A statement from Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray (D-WA) is here. A statement from Committee Ranking Member Richard Burr (R-NC) is here.
March 18, 2021

HELP to begin consideration of Marten as Deputy USED Secretary this week: On March 24 at 10:00 am, the Senate HELP Committee will hold a full Committee hearing to begin consideration of the nomination of Cindy Marten to serve as Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education (USED). Marten is currently the superintendent of San Diego Unified School District. The hearing will be streamed here.
March 24, 2021

Coronavirus Updates (as related to education):

Administration:

U.S. Department of Education (USED):

Department updates HEER fund guidance, provides additional flexibility for institutional uses: On March 19, the U.S. Department of Education (USED) published guidance regarding the use of funds received under the Higher Education Emergency Relief (HEER) Fund. The Department’s guidance expands upon types of students who qualify for emergency student financial aid by allowing institutions to make financial aid grants to dual enrollment, continuing education, non-degree seeking, or non-credit students. Additionally, institutions may award financial aid grants to students with “exceptional needs,” such as certain refugees or persons granted asylum. The guidance also notes that institutions may use their own grants to reimburse themselves for lost revenue while supporting students during the pandemic, including discharging unpaid institutional balances and subsidizing child care services for student parents. Further, the guidance provides institutions with additional flexibility in HEER Fund uses by allowing them to use funds to reimburse themselves for lost revenue and expenses incurred as far back as March 13, 2020 – the start of the pandemic-related national emergency. This is a change from prior guidance pertaining to HEER funding, as appropriated by the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations (CRRSA) Act, which had only allowed funds to be used for costs incurred on or after Dec. 27, 2020. A press release is here. The Department’s Notice of Interpretation is here. An FAQ related to lost revenue is here. The updated FAQs are here.
March 19, 2021

Cardona to states – ESSER Funds on the way ‘this month’: USED announced that it will begin dispersing funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) to states by the end of March. The Elementary and Secondary Education Emergency Relief (ESSER) funds will provide states and districts resources to continue addressing the impacts of the pandemic and to help schools reopen safely for in-person learning. The Department noted in its announcement that the ARP funds can be used by states and districts to equitably expand opportunities for students who need the funds most, including students from low-income backgrounds, students of color, students with disabilities, English language learners, students experiencing homelessness, and students with inadequate access to technology. A press release is here. A breakdown of state-by-state allocations of ARP ESSER Funds is here. A fact sheet on the ARP ESSER Fund is here. A letter sent to state education chiefs is here. An EducationCounsel summary of the ARP, as related to education funding, is here.

Relatedly, USED Secretary Cardona joined a White House press briefing to outline his priorities for supporting schools reopening. “My priority right now is to safely reopen as many schools as possible, as quickly as possible. To do that… I have notified all 50 states… of the amount of funds they’ll be receiving from the American Rescue Plan,” stated the Secretary. During his remarks, Secretary Cardona also noted that states will be submitting reports to the Department on how they are going to use funds from the ARP and expects those reports to be public. Further, the Secretary noted that schools will be using funds to plan for reopening this spring but should also be considering how funds can be used next school year to support students and staff. A full readout of the Secretary’s remarks is here.
March 17, 2021

USED to hold first national summit on school reopening this Wednesday: USED announced that it will be holding a National Safe School Reopening Summit on March 24 starting at 12:00 pm. The summit will feature remarks by First Lady Jill Biden and will focus on how schools can reopen safely and quickly. Specifically, the summit will include three sessions – Lessons from the Field: Implementing the Center for Disease Control (CDC)’s K-12 Operational Strategy to Keep Students, Educators, and Staff Safe; Technical Assistance from CDC and USED: Implementing CDC’s Guidance to Keep Students, Educators, and Staff Safe; and, Supporting All Students: Addressing the Academic, Social, and Emotional Needs of Students with a Focus on Equity. Registration for the summit is here.
March 17, 2021

Volume 2 of USED COVID-19 Handbook to release in early April: USED announced that the Department will release Volume 2 of the K-12 COVID-19 Handbook for districts, schools, and educators in early April. This volume will provide research-based strategies to address the impact of COVID-19 on students, educators, and staff, especially for historically underserved students and communities that have been hit hardest by the pandemic. In February, the Department released the first volume of the COVID-19 Handbook, which provided educators and staff with tools to implement CDC’s K-12 operational strategy for in-person learning. A press release is here.
March 12, 2021

Department outlines plan to ‘aggressively’ support safe school reopening: USED outlined the Department’s plan to help “aggressively” but safely reopen schools. As part of the Department’s efforts, it will curate and publish a “Safe Schools and Campuses Best Practices Clearinghouse,” which will highlight lessons learned from schools and districts related to reopening safely. Additionally, the Department will conduct a “Lessons from the Field” webinar series, which will begin on March 31, with the first webinar expected to focus on summer enrichment. Both the clearinghouse and webinar series will focus on three main areas: safe and healthy environments; providing supports to students; and teacher, faculty and staff well-being, professional development, and supports. A press release is here. The clearinghouse website is here.

Relatedly, USED published a request for information within the Federal Register to seek best practices for the clearinghouse. The notice describes that the Department is seeking information on practices that relate to early childhood, elementary and secondary education, and higher education. Additionally, the notice states that the Department is interested in if the practices shared have a focus on racial equity or other equity focus such as students with disabilities, English learners, students from low-income backgrounds, first-generation college students, students experiencing homelessness, students in or formerly in foster care, LGBTQ+ students, undocumented students, student veterans and military-connected students, student parents, and international students. The full notice is here.  Submissions should also be sent via email to: Bestpracticesclearinghouse@ed.gov.
March 12 & 17, 2021

Institute of Education Sciences (IES):

IES to explore AI, supporting most-impacted students populations with ARP funding: Institute of Education Sciences (IES) Director Mark Schneider published a blog post titled, “The Road to Learning Recovery,” in which he outlines how the agency will use the $100 million allocated within the ARP to study and support innovative approaches to dealing with learning loss. Within the post, Director Schneider announced that the survey of schools to gather data on instruction (e.g. remote learning, in-person learning, or hybrid learning) has been dispatched and will continue running through the rest of the school year. Specifically, Director Schneider outlined that the agency will explore how artificial intelligence can be used to support the identification of best interventions, especially for students with disabilities; will work to identify best practices from states, districts, and schools; will focus future Requests for Applications (RFAs) on efforts to address the needs of hardest-hit student populations such as students with disabilities, students experiencing homelessness, and children in foster care; and will disseminate research and statistics to schools and districts, in more accessible and easier-to-use formats. The full blog is here.
March 16, 2021

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS):

HHS invests $10 billion to support school staff, student testing to monitor COVID spread: HHS announced that the Department will invest $10 billion, provided by the ARP, to support increased screening testing in schools. The Department will invest an additional $2.25 billion to scale testing in underserved communities. Related to the funding for school testing, the Department notes that screening testing, when incorporated into a comprehensive mitigation strategy, for teachers, staff, and students can help schools reopen and remain open. “In addition to ensuring diagnostic testing of symptomatic and exposed individuals, serial screening testing will help schools identify infected individuals without symptoms who may be contagious so that prompt action can be taken to prevent further transmission,” the Department stated. A press release is here.
March 17, 2021

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

CDC updates school reopening guidance, 3 feet okay compared to 6 feet: The CDC published updated guidance to support the reopening of elementary and secondary schools, in light of the continued impacts of the pandemic. The updated guidance recommends that physical distancing of at least 3 feet is sufficient to support reopening, when other mitigation strategies are deployed. This is an update from the CDC’s previous recommendation of at least 6 feet. Additionally, the updated guidance notes that ventilation is a component of strategies to clean and maintain healthy facilities, and it removed the previous recommendation to install physical barriers. The updated guidance is here. A statement from House Education and Labor Committee Ranking Member Virginia Foxx (R-NC) is here.
March 19, 2021

Non-Coronavirus Updates:

Congress:

Senate:

Bipartisan coalition of Senators reintroduce College Transparency Act: Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Tim Scott (R-SC), and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) introduced S.839, the “College Transparency Act” (CTA). The bill would repeal a ban on student-level data collection and would create a secure, privacy protected student-level data network within the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). This will modernize the college reporting system for postsecondary data by providing accurate reporting on student outcomes such as enrollment, completion, and post-college earnings across colleges and majors, while ensuring the privacy of individual students is securely protected. According to a press release, the bill would “give students a clear understanding of the return on investment in higher education and help point them towards schools and programs of study best suited to their unique needs and desired outcomes.” The full press release is here. A fact sheet on the bill is here. The bill text is here.
March 18, 2021

Burr, King reintroduce Repay Act to simplify student loan repayment options: Senate HELP Committee Ranking Member Richard Burr (R-NC) and Senate Angus King (I-ME) introduced S.821, the “Repay Act,” which is bipartisan legislation to reform federal student loan repayment programs. This legislation, which the Senators previously introduced in 2015 and 2017, would simplify and streamline the multiple federal student loan repayment plans that currently exist into only two repayment plan options: a fixed, 10-year repayment plan, and a single, simplified income-driven repayment option. A press release is here. The bill text is here.
March 18, 2021

House:

House adopts Dreamers Act, CAPTA reauthorization; both bills face uncertain path in Senate: On March 18, the House passed the H.R.6, the “American Dream and Promise Act of 2021,” by a vote of 228-197. The bill would provide a path to citizenship for an estimated 2.5 million young people brought to the U.S. as children, also known as “Dreamers,” as well as others given Temporary Protected Status (TPS) when fleeing unrest in their home country. The bill will also apply to those granted a Deferred Enforcement Departure (DED), which allows people to remain in the U.S. beyond their initial authorization due to conditions in their home country. The bill will move next to the Senate, where its fate remains uncertain. A statement from Rep. Roybal-Allard is here. A statement by President Biden is here. A fact sheet on the bill is here. The bill text is here.

On March 16, the House passed H.R.485, “the Stronger Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (Stronger CAPTA),” by a vote of 345-73, which will reauthorize CAPTA through fiscal year (FY) 2027 and will expand services for preventing and treating child abuse. Specifically, the bill includes new requirements for HHS to establish national standards for tracking and reporting child fatalities along with near-fatalities as a result of maltreatment, and sets up an electronic infrastructure for states to share information from their respective child abuse and neglect registries. A statement from Chairman Scott is here, a statement from Ranking Member Virginia Foxx (R-NC) is here, and a press release from both Committee leaders is here. A fact sheet is here. The bill text is here.
March 16 & 18, 2021

Administration:

U.S. Department of Education (USED):

USED rolls back Trump formula for borrower defense claims, will offer full discharge for approved claims: USED announced that it will rescind the Trump Administration’s formula for discharging loans due to borrower defense claims. Instead, the Department will streamline debt relief determinations for claims and will offer 100 percent discharge of borrowers’ related federal student loans. This process will also apply to those borrowers who have received prior approvals for loan discharge but did not receive 100 percent relief. According to the Department, this change is estimated to help approximately 72,000 borrowers and will result in the cancellation of $1 billion in loans. Relatedly, the Department notes that it will pursue in the future re-regulation of the borrower defense rule in order to fully address the regulations. The full announcement is here, and a press release from House Education and Labor Committee Chair Bobby Scott (D-VA) is here.
March 18, 2021

Upcoming Events (Congressional and Administration):

Congress:

  • On March 23 at 10:00 am, the House Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor/HHS) Appropriations Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled, “Addressing the Maternal Health Crisis.” The hearing will feature testimony from Lisa Asare, Assistant Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health; Dr. Wendy Gordon, Associate Professor from Bastyr University; Dr. Carol Sakala, Director for Maternal Health for the National Partnership for Women and Families; and Stacey Stewart, President and CEO of the March of Dimes. The hearing will be streamed here.
  • On March 24 at 10:00 am, the Senate HELP Committee will hold a full Committee hearing titled, “Nomination of Cynthia Marten to serve as Deputy Secretary of Education.” The hearing will feature testimony from Cindy Marten, who has been nominated to serve as USED Deputy Secretary. The hearing will be livestreamed here.
  • On March 25 at 1:00 pm, the House Education and Labor Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled, “Lessons Learned: Charting the Path to Educational Equity Post-COVID-19.” Witnesses have not yet been announced. More information and the livestream will be posted here.
  • On March 25 at 1:00 pm, the House Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled, “The Effects of COVID-19 on Arts and Humanities Organizations.” Witnesses will include Kathleen Mundell, Director of Cultural Resources; Caleb Cage, from the Nevada Humanities Board of Trustees; Deborah Len, Director of the Museum of Glass; and Ulysses Slaughter, Project Manager for Chester Made. More information and the livestream will be posted here.
  • On March 25 at 2:30 pm, the House Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (T/HUD) Appropriations Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled, “Creating Equitable Communities through Transportation and Housing.” The hearing will feature testimony from Dorval Carter, President of the Chicago Transit Authority; Steve Kirk, President of Rural Neighborhoods Incorporated; Elizabeth Kneebone, Research Director of the University of California-Berkley; and Dr. Catherine Ross, Professor from the Georgia Institute of Technology. The livestream will be posted here.

Administration:

  • On March 24 at 12:00 pm, USED will hold an event titled, “National Safe School Reopening Summit.” The summit will feature remarks by First Lady Jill Biden and will focus on how schools can reopen safely and quickly. Specifically, the summit will include three sessions – Lessons from the Field: Implementing CDC’s K-12 Operational Strategy to Keep Students, Educators, and Staff Safe; Technical Assistance from CDC and ED: Implementing CDC’s Guidance to Keep Students, Educators, and Staff Safe; and, Supporting All Students: Addressing the Academic, Social, and Emotional Needs of Students with a Focus on Equity. Registration is here.
  • On March 24 at 4:00 pm, the Federal School Safety Clearinghouse and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) will hold an event titled, “Funding School Safety: Department of Justice Grant Opportunities.” The webinar is part of the Federal School Safety Clearinghouse’s 2021 School Safety Webinar Series. This webinar will focus on funding opportunities, eligibility and eligible uses for grants available, key requirements and deadlines, and helpful tips for developing and submitting applications. The Federal School Safety Clearinghouse is an interagency collaboration between DOJ, USED, and HHS to provide a comprehensive and centralized location for federal school safety resources. More information and registration are here.

Upcoming Events (Outside Organizations):

  • On March 22 at 1:00 pm, the Cato Institute will hold an event titled, “Choice Does Not ‘Siphon’ Public School Money: A Primer.” The webinar will discuss recent state efforts to expand school choice options for parents and families and will confront the oft-cited critique that choice programs reduce funding for public schools. More information and registration are here.
  • On March 23 at 2:00 pm, the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) will hold and event titled, “Hybrid homeschooling: The future of education?” The webinar will discuss the rapid adoption of virtual learning due to the pandemic, and the potential for a hybrid-learning model to persist once schools reopen permanently. More information and registration are here.
  • On March 23 at 3:00 pm, the Aurora Institute will hold an event titled, “A Strategic Reflection on the Field of Competency-Based Education.” The webinar will discuss how schools and districts across the United States are realizing the promise of competency-based education—transforming the culture, structure, and pedagogy of the traditional time-based system into one that is designed to help every student succeed. More information and registration are here.
  • On March 24 at 3:00 pm, the Education Trust will hold an event titled, “What the American Rescue Plan Act Means for Equity and Education.” The webinar will discuss how the ARP can support improvements in the nation’s education system. More information and registration are here.
  • On March 25 at 12:00 pm, the Washington Post will hold an event titled, “U.S. Higher Education: Rethinking the Possibilities.” The webinar will discuss how the pandemic has widened the already widening inequality in postsecondary access, especially for lower income students. More information and registration are here.

Publications (Congressional and Administration):

  • On March 17, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) published a report titled, “Outside Jobs Among U.S. Public School Teachers.” The report uses data from the public school teacher survey of the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS) to examine the supplemental school year income earned at jobs outside the school system by public school teachers in the U.S. Key findings from the report include identifying that in the 2017–18 school year, 18 percent of public school teachers supplemented their base salary with a job outside the school system; that 55 percent of teachers who worked a second job during the school year indicated that their other job was outside the education field; and that mathematics teachers had the highest rate of teaching or tutoring as a focus of their second jobs at 35 percent. The full report is here.

Publications (Outside Organizations):

  • On March 17, the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) published a report titled, “Impacts of Covid-19 on Preschool Enrollment and Spending.” The report examines findings from two nationally representative surveys conducted by NIEER of parents of children aged 3 to 5 old (not yet in kindergarten) in the spring of 2020 and in December 2020. Both surveys found that enrollment declines and threats to preschool funding pose major problems for states. Other key findings include identifying that preschool participation in the fall of 2020 had fallen from 71 percent to 54 percent, including all delivery models (in-person, remote, and hybrid options); that children in the lowest-income families had especially large declines in in-person preschool participation, with just 14 percent in-person compared to 42 percent for all other children; and that states must invest in high quality teaching that meets children’s individual needs, particularly due to a pandemic-induced spike in child social and emotional problems that will likely continue when children return to school in the fall. The full report is here.
  • On March 17, the Education Commission of the States (ECS) published a report titled, “Governors’ Top Education Priorities in 2021 State of the State Addresses.” The report analyzes 42 governors’ State of the State addresses and the education-related proposals mentioned within, and found that in 2021, governors unsurprisingly focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and its implications for students, teachers, and education more broadly. Key highlights from the report include noting that the majority of governors discussed school funding, including the use of federal dollars to help support early, K-12, and higher education; just half of governors discussed reopening schools, with an emphasis on efforts to get students back into physical classrooms while ensuring a safe environment; and that a little under half of governors mentioned the physical and mental health needs of students, teachers, and school workers. The full report is here.
  • On March 16, Know Your IX published a report titled “The Cost of Reporting: Perpetrator Retaliation, Institutional Betrayal, and Student Survivor Pushout.” The report examines results from Know Your IX’s survey of more than 100 student survivors who formally reported sexual violence to their schools found a massive failure on the part of schools to fulfill their obligations under Title IX. Key findings from the report include identifying that 39 percent of survivors who reported sexual violence to their schools experienced a substantial disruption in their educations; that many college and graduate school survivors reported dropping at least one class, if not more, following the sexual violence; and that 35 percent of survivors surveyed reported that their schools explicitly encouraged them to take time off. The full report is here.
  • On March 15, a group of thinktanks and higher education organizations, including the Center for American Progress (CAP), New America, the Institute for College Access & Success (TICAS), the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), and the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Project on Student Borrower Success, published a joint memo detailing recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education (USED) to smoothly and successfully transition borrowers back into repayment on their federal student loan when the extended pause on payments, interest accrual, and collections activity due to the ongoing pandemic comes to an end. Key recommendations from the memo include advocating that USED and the FSA use the roughly $91 million in the latest coronavirus relief package to provide intensive and targeted outreach to borrowers who demonstrated signs of struggle before the pause; that FSA provide clarity to borrowers regarding auto-debit payments, which were turned off by servicers when the forbearance period started; and that USED implement flexibilities to streamline income-driven repayment (IDR) enrollment. The full memo is here.
  • On March 11, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business published a report titled, “COVID-19: Cost of Virtual Schooling by Race and Income.” The report uses data from the Philadelphia school district and 63 neighboring suburban school districts to analyze the trade-off between average costs of a new COVID-19 infection and future income losses to students from missed education. Key findings from the report include identifying that districts with more white students are more likely to reopen, even after accounting for differences in income; that Black students in grades K-5 have lost about 11.9 percent of lifetime income while white students in K-5 have lost 10.4 percent; and that schools located in Philadelphia are less likely to reopen relative to suburban districts, indicating an urban-suburban divide. The full report is here.
  • On March 11, Third Way published a report titled, “Five Critical Higher Ed Investments That Aren’t Debt Cancellation.” The report explores other investments, besides debt cancellation, that Congress and the new Administration could make to ensure that college is accessible and pays off for all students going forward. Key recommendations in the report include advocating for doubling the Pell Grant; making defrauded borrowers whole by offering full loan discharges and compensation for lost wages; investing in minority-serving institutions (MSIs) and historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs); revamping the “broken” student loan system by auto-enrolling more borrowers in IDR plans; and establishing a Federal-State partnership to promote college affordability. The full report is here.

Legislation:

H.R.1903
A bill to amend title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965 with respect to partnership grants for the establishment of rural teaching residency programs, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Mike Bost (R-IL)

H.R.1904
A bill to include broadband as a utility that tenants residing in federally assisted housing can have subsidized by the Federal Government, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D-NY)

H.R.1911
A bill to provide assistance with respect to child care infrastructure, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Katherine Clark (D-MA)

H.R.1912
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to clarify the treatment of certain institutional financial assistance.
Sponsor: Rep. Rodney Davis (R-IL)

H.R.1918
A bill to provide for the refinancing and recalculation of certain Federal student loans, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. John Garamendi (D-CA)

H.R.1919
A bill to amend the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 to treat attendance at an institution of higher education the same as work for the purpose of determining eligibility to participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).
Sponsor: Rep. Jimmy Gomez (D-CA)

H.R.1928
A bill to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to protect students from sexual abuse, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA)

H.R.1931
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require institutions of higher education to disclose hazing incidents, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Lucy McBath (D-GA)

H.R.1959
A bill to promote and ensure delivery of high-quality special education and related services to students with visual disabilities or who are deaf or hard of hearing or deaf-blind through instructional methodologies meeting their unique learning needs, to enhance accountability for the provision of such services, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-PA)

H.R.1963
A bill to amend the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 1990 to modify certain State uses of funds
Sponsor: Rep. Michelle Fischbach (R-MN)

H.R.1973
A bill to require the Secretary of Health and Human Resources to submit to the Congress a report on State child care regulations.
Sponsor: Rep. Ashley Hinson (R-IA)

H.R.1981
A bill to require the Comptroller General to submit a report on the transfer of student debt functions from the Department of Education to the Department of the Treasury, including costs of such a transfer and the mitigation of the duplication of duties by Federal agencies, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Greg Murphy (R-NC)

H.R.2011
A bill to amend the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 to increase the age of eligibility for children to receive benefits under the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT)

H.R.2023
A bill to authorize a pilot program for dyslexia screening and early literacy intervention using evidence-based services for students suspected of having an early reading deficiency or dyslexia, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Chrissy Houlahan (D-PA)

H.R.2027
A bill to direct Federal science agencies and the Office of Science and Technology Policy to undertake activities to improve the quality of undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and enhance the research capacity at the Nation’s HBCUs, tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), and MSIs, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX)

H.R.2028
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to authorize a program to recognize institutions of higher education that offer outstanding services and programs for foster and homeless youth, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Daniel Kildee (D-MI)

H.R.2030
A bill to establish a postsecondary student data system.
Sponsor: Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL)

H.R.2034
A bill to direct the Secretary of Education to forgive the Federal student loans of borrowers meeting certain income requirements, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Al Lawson (D-FL)

H.R.2037
A bill to extend Federal Pell Grant eligibility of certain short-term programs.
Sponsor: Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI)

H.R.2048
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 in order to improve the service obligation verification process for TEACH Grant recipients, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC)

H.R.2057
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require program participation agreements between institutions of higher education and Hanban if a Confucius Institute operates on the campus of the institution.
Sponsor: Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX)

S.744
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require institutions of higher education to disclose hazing incidents, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)

S.775
A bill to require institutions of higher education to disclose hazing-related misconduct, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA)

S.813
A bill to promote and ensure delivery of high-quality special education and related services to students with visual disabilities or who are deaf or hard of hearing or deaf-blind through instructional methodologies meeting their unique learning needs, to enhance accountability for the provision of such services, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Ed Markey (D-MA)

S.821
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to establish a simplified income-driven repayment plan, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Richard Burr (R-NC)

S.822
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to require program participation agreements between institutions of higher education and Hanban if a Confucius Institute operates on the campus of the institution.
Sponsor: Senator Marsha Blackburn (R-TN)

S.827
A bill to authorize the Secretary of Education to establish and maintain a public website tracking the expenditures by States of COVID-19 education relief funds.
Sponsor: Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA)

S.839
A bill to establish a postsecondary student data system.
Sponsor: Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA)

S.847
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to eliminate origination fees on Federal Direct loans.
Sponsor: Senator Mike Braun (R-IN)

S.848
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 in order to improve the service obligation verification process for TEACH Grant recipients, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Mike Braun (R-IN)

S.864
A bill to extend Federal Pell Grant eligibility of certain short-term programs.
Sponsor: Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA)

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