E-Update for the Week of May 3, 2021

E-Update for the Week of May 3, 2021

Highlights:

  • On April 30, USED announced it has published resources to the Safer Schools and Campuses Best Practices Clearinghouse.
  • On April 28, President Biden announced his intent to nominate Roberto Rodriguez, the current President and CEO of Teach Plus, to serve as Assistant Secretary of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development at the U.S. Department of Education (USED).
  • On April 28, President Biden unveiled his American Families Plan, which is his third proposal to support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. The American Families Plan would provide an estimated $1.8 trillion over ten years and builds upon the president’s previously proposed $2.5 trillion American Jobs Plan, which is focused on the nation’s infrastructure, and the already-enacted $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act (ARP).

Biden Administration:

Nominations and Personnel:

Biden taps former Obama education advisor to serve as USED planning, evaluation, policy lead: President Biden announced his intent to nominate Roberto Rodriguez, the current President and CEO of Teach Plus, to serve as Assistant Secretary of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development at the U.S. Department of Education (USED).  In a statement from USED Secretary Miguel Cardona, the Secretary praised President Biden’s pick, and called Rodriguez “a fierce advocate for educational equity who will ensure we prioritize, replicate and invest in solutions that work for all students.” During the Obama Administration, Rodriguez served as an education advisor on the White House Domestic Policy Council (DPC).  The nomination has been referred to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee but no hearing has been scheduled.  An announcement from the White House is here, and a statement Secretary Cardona is here.
April 28, 2021

Schumer advances Marten nomination, vote likely week of May 10: Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) filed a motion to vote on Marten’s confirmation.  The Senate is in recess until the week of May 10, so Marten’s nomination may be considered that week when the Senate returns. It is unclear when Kvaal’s nomination will be considered. An announcement on the filed motion is here.
April 29, 2021

Coronavirus Updates (as related to education):

Administration:

White House:

Biden proposes $225 billion for child care, $200 billion for universal pre-K, and $109 billion for free community college in American Families Plan: President Biden unveiled his American Families Plan, which is his third proposal to support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.  The American Families Plan would provide an estimated $1.8 trillion over ten years and builds upon the president’s previously proposed $2.5 trillion American Jobs Plan, which is focused on the nation’s infrastructure, and the already-enacted $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act (ARP). Complementing proposed investments in the American Jobs Plan for early childhood, K-12, and higher education facilities, the American Families Plan proposes additional significant investments in child care and early childhood education, educator preparation and support, as well as higher education access and support. Key provisions in the plan include $200 billion for a federal-state partnership program to offer free, high-quality, accessible, and inclusive preschool to all 3- and 4-year-olds; $225 billion to increase access to high-quality, affordable child care; $109 billion for federal-state partnerships to support first-time students and workers to enroll tuition-free in community college; $80 billion to increase the max Pell Grant by $1,400; and, $46 billion for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), and other Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs).  Additionally, the plan proposes an extension of the expanded Child Tax Credit (CTC), as enacted in the American Rescue Plan, through 2025, an extension of the expanded Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit (CDCTC), and a permanent expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). A fact sheet for the American Families Plan is here.
April 28, 2021

U.S. Department of Education (USED):

Department publishes 150 resources in launch of Safe Schools and Best Practices Clearinghouse: USED announced it has published resources to the Safer Schools and Campuses Best Practices Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse is intended to highlight innovative work that is currently underway to reopen K-12 schools, early childhood education centers, and postsecondary institutions. The Clearinghouse is organized into three main topic areas – Safe and Healthy Environments; Supports for Students; and Teacher, Faculty, and Staff Well-Being, and Professional Development and Supports. The Department noted that it received over 500 submissions, including over 1,500 resources, but the Clearinghouse only currently includes 180 resources. A press release is here. The Clearinghouse is here.
April 30, 2021

Department officially launches CCSSO, NGA partnership on Summer Learning: USED held a convening to launch the Department’s Summer Learning and Enrichment Collaborative, which is a joint effort between the Department, the Council for Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and the National Governors Association (NGA). The convening – held on April 26 and 27 – while not offering significant policy announcements, reinforced USED Secretary Miguel Cardona’s emphasis on community partnerships and equity.  Throughout the convening, the Department also emphasized the existing resources (e.g. the American Rescue Plan) that can be used to address the academic, social, emotional, and mental health needs of students. Day One of the convening, which highlighted the voices of several critical stakeholders – state and district leaders, principals, teachers, and advocates – focused on the importance of collaboration and thinking creatively for how to best serve students during this summer (and beyond). Meanwhile, Day Two focused on evidence-based strategies to supporting summer learning enrichment, while also providing opportunities for participants to explore other topics of interest in breakout sessions. A press release is here.
April 26 and 27, 2021

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS):

ACF outlines efforts to support child care, cross sector partnerships: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary Katie Hamm published a blog post titled, “This is Our Moment: Transforming Child Care through the American Rescue Plan and Cross-Sector Partner Engagement.” Hamm describes the resources included in the ARP intended to support child care, including resources for Head Start and the new Child Care Stabilization Fund. Additionally, Hamm notes that ACF and the Office of Early Childhood Development are partnering with states, tribes, territories, and communities to provide guidance and technical assistance on how to use funding wisely. The Agency will work with the Early Childhood Health and Well-Being Leadership Group, which is a cross-agency working group, to support grantees in partnering across sector to prioritize child care and early childhood development through ARP investments. Hamm also notes that in May, the Office of Early Childhood Development will launch a stakeholder engagement strategy to provide updates on ARP guidance, share innovative strategies and resources, and provide technical assistance. The full blog post is here. Registration for the launch is here.
April 30, 2021

Congress:

House:

Foxx, Murphy press Cardona on CARES Act required reporting: House Education and Labor Committee Ranking Member Virginia Foxx (R-NC) and Higher Education and Workforce Investment Subcommittee Ranking Member Greg Murphy (R-NC) wrote a letter to USED Secretary Miguel Cardona pushing the Department to comply with a reporting requirement mandated by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act regarding the use of waiver flexibilities for certain matching requirements, uses of funds, eligibility data requirements, and regulations during the pandemic. In the letter, the Members write that though the CARES Act waiver authorities require USED to report to the authorizing Committees every 180 days on details of which institutions received a waiver under each section, the authorizing Committees have yet to receive this information. The Members ask for the Department to send the required information “immediately,” and to include the date by which they can expect the next update. The letter is here, and a press release is here.
April 27, 2021

Non-Coronavirus Updates:

Administration:

White House:

Biden touts accomplishments, outlines expansive new role for federal government in first joint address to Congress: President Biden delivered his first joint address to Congress during which he advocated for increased federal investments through two proposals – the American Jobs Plan and the American Families plan (see below). The President also highlighted some of the Administration’s accomplishments during his first 100 days in office and outlined several other issues that he intends to address in the upcoming year. Additional key themes from the President’s address include calling for unity in the face of threats to the nation’s democracy; and setting an optimistic tone as the country continues to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. Though he said the passage of the American Rescue Plan (ARP) Act has put America “on the move again,” President Biden used much of his address to push for continued, historic federal investments to “rebuild the nation,” “root out” systemic racism, and “deliver real equity.”  President Biden framed the American Jobs Plan as a “blue collar blueprint to rebuild America” during this critical time of recovery, and touted its proposed investments in green technology, broadband, and clean water infrastructure that would create jobs accessible to those without postsecondary degrees.  He also provided more details for the recently released American Families Plan, and highlighted the plan’s inclusion of tuition-free community college; free, universal preschool for all 3- and 4 year-olds; and increased access to quality, affordable child care for low-income parents and families. The fact sheet for the American Jobs Plan is here.
April 28, 2021

Congress:

Murray, Scott, re-introduce free community college bill: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray (D-WA) and House Education and Labor Committee Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) re-introduced the America’s College Promise Act (S.1396, H.R.2861). The bill would create federal-state partnerships that would provide two years of free community college, technical college, and HBCUs and other MSIs. The bill would provide a federal match of $3 for every $1 invested by states. While not specifically cited as a framework for President Biden’s American Families Plan, the president’s proposal suggests a similar federal-state partnership in order to offer two years free. “Ensuring free community college for every student is a bold first step that we can take right now to make college more affordable and provide students pathways to higher education and workforce training without debt,” stated Chairwoman Murray. A press release is here.
April 28, 2021

Senate:

HELP Committee explores child care crisis for first time in years, bipartisan support for supporting working mothers and families: The Senate HELP Committee held a hearing titled, “Supporting Children, Workers, and Families by Strengthening America’s Child Care Sector.”  The hearing focused on the importance of child care for children’s development, as well as for supporting the nation’s economy. Specific issues discussed included the impacts of the pandemic on the child care sector, how high-quality and affordable child care can be supported, how to support early childhood educators, and what working families face when trying to find accessible child care options. Key takeaways from the hearing include Chairwoman Patty Murray (D-WA) underscoring of the urgency to address the child care crisis, noting that the nation’s economy relies on working families having access to affordable, high-quality child care; Ranking Member Richard Burr’s (R-NC) recognizing the importance of supporting the child care sector, but also his wariness of proposals that would create universal solutions and limit choices for parents and families; and witnesses’ overwhelming emphasis on the need to increase investments in child care, particularly for low-income families. A recording of the hearing is here, a press release from Chairwoman Murray is here, and a press release from Ranking Member Burr is here.
April 27, 2021

House:

House Education and Labor Committee explores infrastructure needs of schools, child care centers, colleges: The House Education and Labor Committee held a hearing titled, “Building Back Better: Investing in Improving Schools, Creating Jobs, and Strengthening Families and our Economy.” The hearing focused on President Biden’s American Jobs Plan, with a focus on the proposed investments to improve the infrastructure of the nation’s child care centers, schools, and workforce. During the hearing, House Education and Labor Committee Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) praised the plan, specifically highlighting the proposed $100 billion for public workforce systems, such as apprenticeships and sector-based training; $100 billion to repair hazardous and outdated school facilities; significant investments to increase access to quality, affordable child care; and increased funding to support community colleges. “Substantial investments in the infrastructure of our schools, workforce, and communities will help overcome the COVID-19 pandemic and build back a better economy for all Americans,” said Chairman Scott (D-VA). Meanwhile, Committee Ranking Member Virginia Foxx (R-NC) criticized the plan as an expansive government overreach, calling it a “Democrat power grab disguised as infrastructure with little real help for struggling Americans.” A recording of the hearing is here. Chairman Scott’s full opening statement is here, and Ranking Member Foxx’s full opening statement is here.
April 29, 2021

Chairman Neal releases discussion draft for paid leave, child care entitlement bill: House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (D-MA) unveiled a discussion draft of the “Building an Economy for Families Act.” The bill would provide universal paid family and medical leave, guaranteed access to child care, and permanently extend the worker and family-related refundable tax credits included in the American Rescue Plan Act. (ARP)“Our economy is premised on the idea that some workers are worthy of ‘perks’, like paid leave or affordable child care that works for their schedules, while the majority are forced to fend for themselves,” Chairman Neal (D-MA) said in a statement. Specifically, the bill would provide universal paid family and medical leave for all workers; increase funds for the Child Care Entitlement to States program; establishes a Child Care Information Network (CCIN) for parents and caregivers to help families find available child care slots; creates a new refundable payroll tax credit for child care providers to raise wages of essential child care workers; and permanently extends the ARP’s expansions of the Child Tax Credit (CTC), Child and Dependent Care Credit (CDCC) and Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). A press release is here.
April 27, 2021

Upcoming Events (Congressional and Administration):

  • On May 5 at 10:00 am, the House Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor/HHS) Appropriations Subcommittee will hold a hearing on the U.S. Department of Education’s fiscal year (FY) 22 budget request. USED Secretary Miguel Cardona is expected to testify. More information will be posted here.
  • On May 6 at 11:30 am, the House Energy and Commerce Committee will hold a Subcommittee hearing titled, “Broadband Equity: Addressing Disparities in Access and Affordability.” No witnesses have yet been announced. More information will be posted here.
  • On May 6 at 2:30 pm, the House Education and Labor Committee will hold a Subcommittee hearing titled, “Addressing the Impact of COVID-19 on Students with Disabilities.” No witnesses have yet been announced. More information will be posted here.

Upcoming Events (Outside Organizations):

  • On May 3 at 10:00 am, the Brookings Institute will hold an event titled, “Analyzing Biden’s First 100 Days.” The webinar will reflect on the first 100 days of the Biden presidency and look forward to what policies may come in the future on key issues, including education. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 3 at 2:00 pm, the RAND Corporation will hold an event titled, “How Teachers and School Leaders Shape Use of Instructional Materials.” The webinar will focus on data from a nationally representative sample of educators to examine how teachers use their main instructional materials, what teachers want from their instructional materials, and how school leaders shape teachers’ use of instructional materials. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 4 at 3:00 pm, Third Way, New America, and the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) will hold an event titled, “What the College Scorecard Can Tell Us About Higher Ed.” The webinar will feature a conversation about higher education’s data problems and how improving access to quality data will also improve student outcomes. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 5 at 1:00 pm, the Center for American Progress (CAP) will hold an event titled, “Continuing Learning and a Safe Reopening.” The webinar will feature educators from across the country, who will discuss their experiences during the pandemic; address best practices for reopening schools in a way that keeps students and educators safe; and examine ways to ensure learning growth after the pandemic without placing unnecessary burdens on students and educators. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 5 at 1:00 pm, the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI), the 74, and Bellwether Partners will hold an event titled, “Parents or the Public: Who Should Hold Schools Accountable? A Debate.” The event will explore how to best hold schools accountable for their performance, and the role of parents versus the government in ensuring schools provide quality instruction for students. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 6 at 10:00 am, the Brookings Institute will hold an event titled, “Re-emerging From COVID-19: Why Children and Cities Need Play Now More Than Ever.” The webinar will highlight how cities are thinking about new opportunities to embed playful learning in the public realm, particularly in under-resourced neighborhoods. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 6 at 4:00 pm, AASA will hold an event titled, “Innovative Action and Equity-Driven Processes for Student Success.” The webinar will feature education leaders from the Compton Unified School District in California, who will share how the district has eliminated the opportunity gap for students in the area of technology by focusing on STEAM initiatives with partners. More information and registration are here.
  • On May 6 at 2:00 pm, the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) will hold an event titled, “Women in the Workforce: Supporting Work and Caregiving During the Pandemic and Beyond.” The webinar will feature a panel discussion on the unique challenges facing female workers and will explore how disproportionate job losses and historic caregiving responsibilities have impacted working women. More information and registration are here.

Publications (Administration):

  • On April, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) published a report titled, “Bottom Line: Transition to College.” The report analyzed data from Bottom Line, an intensive advising program for low-income high school students, most of whom are the first in their family to go to college. Key findings from the report include identifying that the program has “potentially positive effects” on college enrollment and “potentially positive effects” on progression in college, with members of the intervention group seeing an 11 point increase in their likelihood of increasing college enrollment, and a 9 point increase in their likelihood to increase progression in college. The full report is here.

Publications (Outside Organizations):

  • On April 29, Science published a report titled, “Household COVID-19 Risk and In-Person Schooling.” The report examined survey data from more than 130,000 schools across the country to try to determine how much of a COVID-19 risk is posed to students and families by in-person schooling. Key findings from the report include identifying that while infection rates were “higher for adults connected to schools that implemented few or no mitigation measures,” this association may not be causal, and that teachers working outside the home were more likely to report COVID-19-related outcomes than those working at home. The full report is here.
  • On April 29, the Community-Engaged Research and Evaluation Sciences (CERES) Institute published a report titled, “Choices and Challenges: Florida Parents’ Experiences with the State’s McKay and Gardiner Scholarship Programs for Students with Disabilities.” The report examined the experiences of Florida parents eligible for two statewide scholarship programs that serve students with disabilities – the Gardiner and McKay scholarships. Key findings from the report include identifying that navigating school choice for families of students with disabilities is complex, and requires significant time, energy, and additional financial resources; that nearly all parents of scholarship recipients are somewhat or very satisfied with their child’s educational experience; and that participating parents overwhelmingly recommend that the scholarship programs continue, with modifications that would reduce barriers to access for the scholarship. The full report is here.
  • On April 28, the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) published a report titled, “Majority of Admissions, Enrollment, and Academic Records Professionals See Student-Records and Data-Systems as well as Crisis Management Training as Pressing Need.” The report examines the similarities and differences in perceived Professional Development and Training (PD&T) needs between front-line staff, managerial staff, and senior leadership. Key findings include identifying that while senior leadership and managerial staff agree on the top five core competencies training needs for frontline staff, front-line staff does not agree with the assessment of senior leadership; that managerial staff have the greatest level of interest in building their competency in student success; and that the primary challenges in PD&T were summarized as lack of time and funding. The full report is here.
  • On April 27, Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Making Caring Common (MCC) Project published a white paper titled, “Innovation and Justice: Reinventing Selective Colleges.” The paper argues that America’s selective colleges can and should educate “far more” and “far more diverse” students. The paper suggests that “rather than gaining status from how few students they admit,” selective colleges should “tout” how many students they educate. Key recommendations from the paper include “substantially” increasing selective colleges’ size of their undergraduate populations; and creating pathways to bachelor’s degrees that are “more accessible, appealing, and affordable” for more students by and combining traditional residential experiences, field experiences domestically and/or abroad, online learning, and internships. The full paper is here.
  • On April 26, the American Educational Research Association (AERA) published a report titled, “Does the Common Core Have a Common Effect? An Exploration of Effects on Academically Vulnerable Students.” The report analyzes data from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) to determine the student-level impact of implementing the Common Core standards. Key findings from the report include identifying that there is a positive impact on math scores; that there was a large positive effect on economically advantaged students; and that there was no detectable effect on economically disadvantaged students. The author argues that raising state expectations without addressing structural issues burdening economically disadvantaged students may have unintended negative consequences. The full report is here.
  • On April 23, the National Education Association (NEA) published a report titled, “Educator Pay and Student Spending: How Does Your State Rank?” The report analyzes teacher salaries and student spending per state and found that the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted a growing trend toward increased support for students. Other key findings from the report include identifying that the average starting salary for educators in the 2019-20 school year grew modestly – 19.3 percent – since 2009; that salaries failed to keep up with inflation over that same period; and that teacher pay has remained stagnant over the last decade. The full report is here.
  • On April 19, the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) published new data for its “Return to Learn Tracker,” which monitors over 8,500 public school districts’ instructional statuses on a weekly basis to examine which schools are offering fully in-person, hybrid, and fully remote instruction. Key findings include identifying that 61 percent of districts in counties with self-reported high vaccine hesitancy are fully in-person, compared to 33 percent of districts with low vaccine hesitancy; and that school districts in areas with low rates of mask usage and large numbers of people who voted for former President Trump in the 2020 election are most likely to be conducting full in-person classes. The full analysis is here.

Legislation:

H.R.2841
A bill to prohibit a covered athletic association and institution of higher education from prohibiting a student athlete from participating in intercollegiate athletics because such student athlete enters an endorsement contract, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-OH)

H.R.2861
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to establish State and Indian tribe grants for community colleges and grants for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and Minority-Serving Institutions, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI)

H.R.2874
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary of Education to develop a plain language disclosure form for borrowers of Federal student loans, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO)

H.R.2886
A bill to establish universal child care and early learning programs.
Sponsor: Rep. Mondaire Jones (D-NY)

H.R.2896
A bill to amend the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act to allow certain institutions to use geographic preference for procurement of certain foods, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-ME)

H.R.2897
A bill to amend the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 to clarify the availability and appropriateness of training for local food service personnel, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Rep. Mark Pocan (D-WI)

S.1396
A bill to require United States educational institutions to include information regarding financial transactions with the Government of the People’s Republic of China or its affiliates in any petition for certification or recertification with the Student and Exchange Visitor Program.
Sponsor: Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA)

S.1374
A bill to direct the Director of the National Science Foundation to support STEM education and workforce development research focused on rural areas, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS)

S.1377
A bill to extend the effective date for the limitation on colocation and administration of veterans educational assistance State approving agencies, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI)

S.1383
A bill to amend the Public Health Service Act to direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services to develop best practices for the establishment and use of behavioral intervention teams at schools, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator John Cornyn (R-TX)

S.1390
A bill to amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to improve mental health services for students, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator John Kennedy (R-LA)

S.1391
A bill to amend the Public Health Service Act to provide best practices on student suicide awareness and prevention training and condition State educational agencies, local educational agencies, and tribal educational agencies receiving funds under section 520A of such Act to establish and implement a school-based student suicide awareness and prevention training policy.
Sponsor: Senator John Kennedy (R-LA)

S.1394
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to include teacher preparation for computer science in elementary and secondary education.
Sponsor: Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV)

S.1396
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to establish State and Indian Tribe grants for community colleges and grants for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and Minority-Serving Institutions, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)

S.1398
A bill to establish universal child care and early learning programs.
Sponsor: Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)

S.1421
A bill to amend the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act to establish the Food and Nutrition Education in Schools Pilot Program, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ)

S.1440
A bill to make technical corrections to the FAFSA Simplification Act.
Sponsor: Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH)

S.1442
A bill to establish the Corporation for Career Pathways to promote pathways to unfilled and emerging job markets, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV)

S.1445
A bill to revise counseling requirements for certain borrowers of student loans, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA)

S.1448
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to make technical improvements to the Net Price Calculator system so that prospective students may have a more accurate understanding of the true cost of college.
Sponsor: Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA)

S.1452
A bill to require a standard financial aid offer form, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA)

S.1453
A bill to reauthorize title VI of the Higher Education Act of 1965 in order to improve and encourage innovation in international education, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Todd Young (R-IN)

S.1464
A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to direct the Secretary of Education to develop a plain language disclosure form for borrowers of Federal student loans, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Tim Scott (R-SC)

S.1480
A bill to direct the Secretary of Education to deem each month for which certain Federal student loans are in deferment during a period of active duty service as months counted toward public service loan forgiveness.
Sponsor: Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH)

S.1487
A bill to ensure that certain incidents involving a covered employee that are reported to the title IX coordinator at an eligible institution of higher education have been reviewed by the president of the institution and not less than 1 additional member of the institution’s board of trustees, and for other purposes.
Sponsor: Senator Gary Peters (D-MI)

S.1497
A bill to amend the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to ensure protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer youth and their families.
Sponsor: Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA)

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