E-Update for September 11, 2015

On September 8, the House and Senate concluded their August recesses. They have until the end of the fiscal year, September 30, to pass a spending bill to fund the federal government past that point. The next recess will begin on Columbus Day, October 12.
While Congress was away, we released our new EducationCounsel website. We are excited to share our work with visitors and to highlight the important activities of our partners. The new website contains much of the same content, but we have added new features like upcoming events, new ways to access and share publications and our LatestCounsel blog. The LatestCounsel blog includes examples of our ongoing work as well as individuals’ thoughts on various topics.

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Competency-Based Education Goes to Washington

For most of the past decade, Washington, DC’s public schools—arguably more than Congress—have been at the center of the national education reform movement. Whether it’s mayoral control, teacher evaluation and retention, charter schools, universal pre-K, the Common Core State Standards, next-generation school design, or (sigh) how best to stage a magazine photo shoot, almost every important education policy issue has been playing out in schools just around the corner from the US Department of Education and Capitol Hill.

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A New Approach to Problem Solving in Education

How often are teachers charged with fixing the problems that plague our education systems? For years, change in education has occurred through top-down and centralized policymaking. Design thinking, a user-centered approach commonly used in Silicon Valley’s tech firms for the past decade, offers an alternative to these top-down methods. You can read more about design thinking from Ideo (via Harvard Business Review) and Stanford.

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Welcome to the new website of EducationCounsel

Welcome to the new website of EducationCounsel. We are excited to share our work with visitors and to highlight the important activities of our partners. Each day we work to improve education and close the achievement gap, focusing on building systems of quality that are available to all from early childhood through higher education.

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E-Update for July 31, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 24, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 17, 2015

Senate Passes the Every Child Achieves Act: The Senate passed S.1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, by a vote of 81-17 on Thursday, July 16. In committee, 29 amendments were adopted to the bill before it was sent unanimously to the floor on a vote of 22-0. On the Senate floor, 178 amendments were considered and 66 were adopted. Notably, a modified version of Sen. Burr (R-NC)’s amendment #2247 to alter the Title I funding formula was agreed to by a roll call vote of 59-39. The amendment will only impose changes to the formula once Title I funding exceeds $17 billion.

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E-Update for July 10, 2015

House Passes the Student Success Act: The House passed H.R. 5, the Student Success Act, on a very close recorded vote of 218-213. The process began this week with the House Rules Committee meeting on July 7 to establish the rules and amendments in order for debate, and concluded a day later with the final passage of the bill. Of the 14 amendments in order, 5 were agreed to, 9 were not agreed to, and 1 was withdrawn.

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Charting a better way forward for South Carolina after church killings

On the evening of June 17, 2015, a hate crime took place at a Wednesday prayer meeting at Mother Emanuel AME Church near Marion Square in Charleston.
The absolutely horrid nature of the crime, the cold-blooded assassination of innocent people solely because they were black — all under the ideology of white supremacy — shocked us all. It tore at the social fabric we all depend on to carry out our daily lives in a civilized way in our communities and our country. And it is this kind of senseless crime, shaped by racism and fueled by hate and hate talk, that our state must confront in a common sense and deliberate way.

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E-Update for June 26, 2015

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan Announces a Set of Rights to Help Parents Seek High-Quality Education for Their Children: During a speech to the 2015 National Parent Teacher Association Convention, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan released a set of rights that outlines what families should be able to expect for their children’s education. Secretary Duncan listed free, quality preschool; high, challenging standards and engaging teaching and leadership in a safe, supportive, well-resourced school; and an affordable, quality college degree as fundamental educational rights.

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